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Tuesday, April 13
 

7:45am EDT

Welcome to Made in Millersville 2021
Join this session to view Dr. Wubah's welcome video at anytime!

Presenters
DD

Dr. Daniel Wubah

President, Millersville University


Tuesday April 13, 2021 7:45am - 5:00pm EDT
Welcome Message from Dr. Daniel Wubah

8:00am EDT

Exploring Species Adaptation Through Genetic Comparison of Arabidopsis Lyrata Populations Growing on Granitic and Serpentine Soils
A short-lived perennial in the mustard family, Arabidopsis lyrata is often used in studies of plant ecology and evolution due to its high level of morphological and genetic polymorphism. A. lyrata can also grow in disturbed or disadvantaged habitats, such as on nutrient poor serpentine soils high in heavy metals. We aim to provide insight into local adaptation and evolution through examining genetic differences and similarities between A. lyrata populations growing in the same geographic area but in differing habitats, on granitic and serpentine soils in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Using amplification through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of selected microsatellite loci (highly variable regions of the genome), determination of microsatellite allele composition, and statistical analysis, we will determine whether serpentine soil populations are genetically closer to each other, despite geographic distance, or if they are the result of local adaptations of granitic soil populations.

Presenters
CF

Carter Farmer

Biology (BS)
BS

Brianna Steward

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:00am - 9:15am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Biology

8:00am EDT

MU-PAST
MU-Piedmont-area Arctic Storm Tracking (MU-PAST) is a research project involving over 35 undergraduate meteorology majors designed to study the structure and evolution of winter season Arctic fronts as they progress across the Appalachian piedmont region. The project takes a 3-pronged approach: 1) a climatological study of cold fronts affecting the region; 2) a field campaign where three teams conducted balloon-borne upper-air profiles; and 3) a numerical simulation initialized with observational data.

Presenters
AG

Abigayle Gant

Meteorology (BS)
AV

Abigail Valerio

Meteorology (BS)
RF

Rhiannon Fleming

Meteorology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:00am - 9:15am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Meteorology

8:00am EDT

Applying Classroom Check-Up through Teleconsultation
The purpose of this case study was to gain experience as a consultant-in-training for preparation as a future school psychologist, specifically with the Classroom Check-Up coaching model (2020), via teleconsultation. This model follows five problem-solving steps to improve student engagement. After the consultant collected virtual class observation data on four occasions and provided performance feedback, the consultee, a fourth-grade teacher, identified increasing her use of behavior specific praise as an area of desired improvement. The short-term use of the model demonstrated a substantial increase in the teacher’s use of behavior specific praise in her online classroom. Lessons learned from utilizing Classroom Check-Up (2020) through tele-coaching, implications, limitations, and possible future directions for research will also be discussed.

Presenters
DT

Danielle Taylor

School Psychology (MS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:00am - 9:15am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Psychology

8:00am EDT

Meeting the Needs of Unsheltered Homeless in Lancaster City, PA
Economic development has accelerated in Lancaster city at a pace not seen in many years. New progress has brought new attention to the unsheltered residents living in and around the Binn’s Park area in the business improvement district. With Lancaster’s diversifying pool of stakeholders and residents, it is critical that all sides collaborate effectively to ensure the humanization, rather than criminalization, of the homeless population. This research project aims to look at established recommendations, identify best practices and apply them to the local issues that are currently impacting unsheltered homeless population in Lancaster City. Policies need not be crafted for those living in the Binn’s Park area, but rather can be created with their voices included. Including the voices of those impacted by homelessness, can empower them as human beings who deserve a say in their own futures. Those individuals who have experienced homelessness or are currently homeless, should be considered key stakeholders in the development of future action plans. This project will examine ways in which this can be done on a local level.

Presenters
JG

Jenna Graeff

Social Work (MSW)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:00am - 9:15am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Social Work

8:05am EDT

Authors Present! Articles from MUsings: The Graduate Journal
Three Videos to Watch

MUsings: The Graduate Journal continues to be a creative and scholarly outlet for our graduate students as they explore unique topics and share their expertise. This session celebrates the graduate students’ work published in MUsings: The Graduate Journal for Spring 2021 or Spring 2020. Each issue features research articles, short stories, and literary essays. Authors will present their articles, creative work, or personal reflections virtually. Join us in celebrating the authors of MUsings: The Graduate Journal.

Presenters
ML

Mariah Lynch

English (MA)
AD

Ashly Duin

Social Work (MSW)
AG

Abby Gabner

Social Work (MSW)
JH

Josefa Hernandez

Social Work (MSW)
DH

Danielle Hornung

Social Work (MSW)
CL

Channel Lowery

Social Work (MSW)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Benefits of a Student-Run Research Journal
The MiMJ aims to support undergraduate research at Millersville by showcasing research and creativity in a digital form, enhancing student inspiration, motivation, and open-ended academic conversation. The journal provides students who present at the Made in Millersville Conference the chance to formally publish a written summary of their research for a general audience—enhancing their skills in academic writing, translation, professional publishing, and providing an opportunity to showcase their undergraduate research. Furthermore, the journal provides opportunities to undergraduate students who want to learn more about the publication process and serve on the Editorial Board. This presentation will cover the experiences of the 2021 intern team and how the students will use the skills they developed throughout the publication process in their future careers.

Presenters
LF

Leah Freeman

English (BA)
RH

Rachel Hicks

English (BA)
HS

Haley Schott

English (BA)
MS

Macy Souders

Applied Engineering and Technology Management (BS)
SS

Sarah Solomon

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

African American Identity: An Examination of Genealogy, Genetics, and Race
An overview of how the contributions of genealogy, genetics, history, sociology, and psychology play into the understanding of African American identity. The purpose being to answer, how genealogy and genetics studies fit within the context and concept of African American race and racial identity.

Presenters
NA

Niema Abdullah

Early Childhood Education (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Augmenting Manufacturing Execution Systems via Human-Machine Interfaces: Integration, Communication, and Automation
The purpose of this project was to be a stepping stone in my current thesis project I am working on. The goal of my thesis project is to integrate Human-Machine Interfaces, Programmable Logic Controllers, and industrial robotic agents to dynamically communicate and automatically control an industrial process. The integration of a PLC to a work cell was the first step to my project and this allowed me to better grasp networking through the use of setting IP addresses and communication through Ethernet. I was also able to create a IP address list of all the addresses of the devices that can be found on the workbenches in Osburn Halls Automation Lab. This project is also paving a way for students to better understand industrial networking and will be applied to current and future classes.

Presenters
RK

Robert Kiesel

Applied Engineering and Technology Management (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

K-2S0
In this class project, the goal was to use knowledge we obtained in the class by designing and 3D printing a droid named K-2SO from the movie Rogue One, which is part of the Star Wars cinematic universe. The goal was to achieve a moveable and realistic duplicate of the droid that was much smaller than the one portrayed in the movie. By using the skills taught in Computer-Aided Engineering Drawing class in the Fall 2020 year, we were able to successfully reverse engineer, sketch, design, and 3D print the model. In order to print this model, MakerBot software, a 3D printer, and solidworks were all utilized to create a finished product. By dividing the model into different parts and using ball joints to connect them together, the model was then able to move its limbs. This project taught us important skills such as abstract and critical thinking, problem solving, the importance of creativity, working on a team, prototyping, and setting goals/benchmarks.

Presenters
RK

Robert Kiesel

Applied Engineering and Technology Management (BS)
EW

Ermias Wogari

Applied Engineering and Technology Management (BS)
LT

Lee Tarter

Applied Engineering and Technology Management (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Exploring Home
This series is an exploration of watercolor that has allowed me to explore the medium while depicting something very personal. Throughout my life, my family has traveled to Vermont. The scenery has always left me in awe and inspired me to create. I’ve always had this idea to depict scenery from the state, but it wasn’t until I discovered watercolor that my idea fully came to fruition. I narrowed my concept down to depicting my favorite places at my home away from home. Through these paintings, I used color to express the emotions attached to the locations. It challenged me to think about the use of color and the emotional connection they can create with the viewer. Although it’s not a medium I was used to, my exploration pushed my artwork to grow in numerous ways.

Presenters
TM

Tara Murdock

Art (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

FreeFall Laser Engraver Waterless Lithography Workshop Exhibition
Sarah Pike, printmaker, and owner of FreeFall Laser led a two-session visiting artist workshop that integrated new technology with traditional printmaking techniques. In this student-centered workshop Sarah shared her research in laser engraving waterless lithography plates and walked students through the process of creating laser-ready files, fine tuning settings with step tests, and troubleshooting. Sarah believes strongly in empowering students to understand the relationship between how the laser cutter operates, its effect on materials, and how to advance its application in the fine arts through safe experimentation. Participants of the workshop will be presenting an exhibition of work produced with this process. / Sarah Pike, printmaker, and owner of FreeFall Laser led a two-session visiting artist workshop that integrated new technology with traditional printmaking techniques. In this student-centered workshop Sarah shared her research in laser engraving waterless lithography plates and walked students through the process of creating laser-ready files, fine tuning settings with step tests, and troubleshooting. Sarah believes strongly in empowering students to understand the relationship between how the laser cutter operates, its effect on materials, and how to advance its application in the fine arts through safe experimentation. The participants have used this process to develop art for an online exhibition for Made at Millersville.

Presenters

Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Roots of the Susquehanna River
Floodwaters regularly inundate trees that grow beside the Susquehanna River. The flooding erodes the riverbank and exposes the roots of the tree. I am inspired by how the trees still survive after so many storms. In this series, I tried to capture the grit, the steadfastness, of these trees, and the foundation these roots provide to the tree to withstand enormous flows. I tried to show the relative permanence of the tree, yet these are temporary and sooner or later will succumb to a flood. There is meaning in this for our lives, in how we humans are inundated with tribulations and with the right supports, we endure.

Presenters
JW

Joyce Williams

Art (M.Ed.)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

The Beauty of the Landscape
When considering my art, I realized that I had never made art in response to worship. I am a Christian, but my faith was not evident in my artwork. One night my watercolor class met outside. We painted as the sun set and the moon rose. The sky was changing so fast that you could not capture it before the next brilliant color appeared. It was beautiful, and it was only then that I realized I was painting God's creation of nature. Since then I have been spending time painting outside, enjoying the beauty of the landscape that is all around us. God is an incredible artist and these paintings are how I worship him.

Presenters

Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Administration of Valerenic Acid Reduces Anxiety-like Behavior in Young-Adult Female (C57BL/6J) Mice
Extracts from the plant Valeriana officinalis are commonly used as an herbal remedy to treat anxiety and insomnia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated that valerenic acid (VA), a chemical component of Valeriana extracts, binds to a specific type of receptor for one of the brain’s major inhibitory neurotransmitters (i.e., gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors). However, there is relatively little in vivo evidence that VA affects behavior. The purpose of these experiments was to test whether administration of VA produces measurable changes in anxiety-like, depression-like, or locomotor behaviors in a mouse model. Groups of adolescent female mice were given one of three dosages of VA dissolved in ethanol (3mg/kg, 6mg/kg, or 12mg/kg), an ethanolic control solution, or diazepam (i.e., Valium, 1mg/kg), a federally approved treatment for anxiety. Afterwards, each mouse was tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM), open field test (OFT), and tail suspension test (TST), in that order. All tests were video recorded and analyzed for various behavioral parameters. The results demonstrated that VA reduced anxiety-like behavior in the EPM. Furthermore, the behavioral effects of VA largely mimicked those of diazepam.

Presenters
NP

Natalie Pinder

Biology (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  Biology

8:05am EDT

Differential gene expression in first-stage larvae with divergent developmental outcomes from the human parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis
Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasitic nematode responsible for infecting millions of humans and dogs and causing the potentially fatal disease strongyloidiasis. The unique life cycle of S. stercoralis consists of both parasitic and free-living generations. The genes that regulate the divergent development of two similar stages, post-parasitic first-stage larvae (PP L1) that develop to free-living adults and post-free-living first-stage larvae (PFL L1) that develop to infectious larvae, are unknown. Using RNA collected from both the PP L1 and PFL L1 stages, we identified 193 genes that are significantly up-regulated in PP L1 and 87 that are down-regulated. Homology searches of the up-regulated genes revealed several encoded zinc-finger transcription factors. To characterize these and other differentially expressed genes, we plan to generate phylogenetic trees to determine the relatedness of any protein families as well as use the SignalP and TMHMM servers to refine the location and function of the encoded proteins. The findings will allow us to better understand the genetic mechanisms regulating the life cycle and ultimately how to prevent transmission of S. stercoralis in humans and dogs.

Presenters

Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Effect of Activin A on Scute Formation
Scutes are the thick scales found on the carapace of a turtle shell. They form a mosaic pattern that is unique to each species. Scutes are formed from skin cells and are considered an epidermal appendage, like human hair or the feathers of a bird. Like all epidermal appendages, they arise from a placode (a plate of thickened cells) which forms from the interactions of various signaling pathways and molecules. Ectodysplasin A (EDA) and Activin A are known signaling molecules that are necessary for the development of such appendages. One objective of this research is to test if EDA also plays a necessary role in the development of scutes in turtles using an antagonist antibody (EctoD2) that can block signaling through the EDA receptor. The torsos of turtle embryos were cultured with the antibodies for several days and the formation of scute placodes was analyzed with an in-situ hybridization probe. Exposure to the EctoD2 antibody reduced or completely erased EDA expression during these early stages resulting in no scute formation. When embryos were exposed to Activin A, they had fewer, but larger scutes. Which suggests that they may have fused together. It can be concluded that, EDA is necessary for the formation of scutes during early embryonic turtle development, and that Activin A also plays an important role.

Presenters
DO

Danielle Oberdick

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Game of Microbes; Understanding rhizobacteria’s implications for PA hemp production
Cannabis sativa L. is perhaps one of the most infamous plants worldwide – leading to a history of prohibition. Consequently, little is known about the plant. Cannabis sativa has two main informal groupings: the widely known drug marijuana, and hemp, the psychoactive-free form of Cannabis. With products such as cannabidiol (CBD), hemp seeds, and natural fiber, hemp is exploding in popularity. The demand for these products is increasing, while our knowledge of the plant remains stagnant. While the cultivation of the plant is relatively new to Pennsylvania following the 2017 Farm Bill, farmers are anticipating crop rotation between hemp, corn, and soybeans. In a crop rotation system, there is potential for interaction and transmission of “microbes” or bacteria, fungi, protists, which are collectively known as the microbiome. Recently, the microbiome has been gaining attention for its countless roles in biological systems, ranging from the human intestine to the ocean floor. Microbiota are constantly in flux, and the microbes within them are constantly vying for control. In this project, we aim to quantify the bacterial soil microbiome (rhizosphere) of hemp and compare it to that of corn and soy. Understanding the rhizosphere microbiome allows for the analysis of beneficial and pathogenic rhizobacteria the crops have in common – at the soil level. Understanding the rhizosphere microbial community is key to the successful production of hemp. In this presentation, I will explain the project’s importance, methods, and preliminary results.

Presenters
AS

Alan Snavely

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Interning at a Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education Center
During the fall 2020 semester, I worked as an Animal Care Intern at Aark Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education Center in Chalfont, PA. This rehabilitation center is a 24-hour non-profit organization that sets out to encourage an appreciation and understanding for Pennsylvania native wildlife through rehabilitation, education and training. Aark Wildlife specializes in setting broken bones, treating illnesses, and providing food and shelter to injured and orphaned wildlife with the intention of returning them to their natural environment as soon as possible. During my internship, I gained substantial experience in animal handling techniques of mammals, birds and reptiles. I also learned strong communication skills in regards to my coworkers and the public, as well as team building and problem solving skills in a fast-paced work environment.

Presenters
CT

Cryslen Tuggle

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Land use effects on microplastic abundance and diversity in macroinvertebrates from head water systems
Currently, research efforts have focused on marine and estuarine ecosystems compared to the impact microplastics (MPs) may have on freshwater systems. This study determined the impact that land use had on the presence of MPs in macroinvertebrates over twenty years in the Schuylkill Watershed. We analyzed aquatic insects from 6 headwater streams within land-use types of the Schuylkill watershed from 1999 – 2019. Insects were digested in hydrogen peroxide and filtered to enumerate microplastics using a dissecting microscope. We found land use did impact MP abundance but temporal differences were subtle. This study may shed significant light on the movement of MPs within aquatic macroinvertebrates and across landscapes over time.

Presenters
NL

Nicole Lee

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  Biology

8:05am EDT

Quantifying the Impacts of Invasive Species on Imperiled U.S. Taxa
Invasive species are one of the leading threats causing native species to require federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in the United States. The goal of this project is to identify the top invasive species that threaten species protected under the ESA, how invasive species negatively impact protected animals and how these impacts vary by taxa. We reviewed federal register listing documents for all ESA listed animal species from 1975 through 2020. We identified all ESA listed animal species impacted by invasive species, and the taxa of these invasive species. We also summarized how specific invasive species taxa negatively impact protected animal species through various interaction types (e.g., competition, predation, adverse habitat modification etc.).

Presenters
LB

Lauren Bleyer

Biology (BS)
ER

Emily Ritter

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  Biology

8:05am EDT

Behind the Magic: The Case of The Walt Disney Company
This case aims to promote discussion on the distinct culture and various characteristics of The Walt Disney Company. Every day The Walt Disney Company works to fulfill their mission to “entertain, inform, and inspire people around the globe,” while simultaneously maintaining the values and standards that are recognized throughout the world. For many people, working for Disney is a dream come true. Providing current information on this globally recognized company’s corporate culture, organization structure, motivation strategies, and their strategies for finding the right fit based on personality, this case provides valuable insight for those studying Organizational Behavior. The Walt Disney Company’s iconic customer service, unique company culture, and distinct company organization are key parts of what add up to make Disney the worldwide media conglomerate it is today. A brief set of discussion questions follows this case.

Presenters
LR

Leslea Rodig

Business Administration (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Studies toward 3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone derivatives
Hunanamycin A (HA), isolated from Bacillus hunanensis by MacMillan and co-workers, exhibits antibacterial activity against Gram-negative pathogens such as Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Demand for antibacterial compounds is increasing as bacteria become more resistant to available antibiotics. To further explore HA and structurally related compounds, our project aims to optimize the synthesis of 3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone derivatives. Through preparing α,β-unsaturated amides as starting material for Lewis acid catalyzed cyclization, the quinoline core structures of 8-bromo-4,4-dimethyl-3,4-dihydroquinolin-2(1H)-one and 4,4-Dimethyl-3,4-dihydroquinolin-2(1H)-one were synthesized in 41 and 68 % yield, respectively. This route provides access to a variety of quinoline core structures.

Presenters
YO

Yongyu Ou

Chemistry (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Synthetic studies of substituted cyclobutanes via photoredox catalyzed [2+2] cycloaddition
Photoredox catalysis (PRC), utilizing light energy and transition metals to control single-electron transfer reactions, can produce substituted cyclobutanes, as well as many other structural motifs. Natural products containing cyclobutane rings often exhibit antiviral, antifungal, and anticancer activity; methods allowing for efficient entry into related molecular structures are of potential value. By creating a small library of olefins via a two-step synthetic route from 1-indones and tetralones, we have initiated studies toward exploring the substrate scope and limitations of Ruthenium PRC in the context of [2+2] cycloadditions. Building on the work of Chen et al. Ru(bpy) and Ru(bpm) will be initially screened against a small library of olefins.

Presenters
NM

Nathaniel Maynard

Chemistry (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Kevin Santopadre Future Documentary Movie Trailer
This project is a movie trailer for a documentary I will be filming the summer of 2021. After my graduation I will embark on a five month hike on the Pacific Crest Trail. I will be documenting my experience and creating a professional documentary. With the help of Dr. Stacey Irwin, this documentary will fulfill my requirements for graduation as well as give me a once in a lifetime opportunity to travel across the country in a unique way.

Presenters
KS

Kevin Santopadre

Speech Communication (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Accessibility for All: Enhancing the Curriculum with Assistive Technology (AT)
This session details a proposed positive energy grant project which sought to equip teacher trainees at MU with skills in designing AT devices for the assistive technology lab located in Stayer Hall. How COVID affected the face-to-face implementation will be discussed, and the use of virtual means to train participants and equip the AT laboratory will be further explored.

Presenters
AL

Alisa Landis

Early Childhood Education (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Does small group instruction improve Spring Math scores.
This action research study was conducted to focus on improving students’ Spring Math scores through small group instruction focusing on number sense and math facts. The Spring Math intervention program was used to determine the participants for this study and assess the students’ ability to increase their scores. Spring Math data has been collected throughout the entire year as a pre-assessment to determine the class’s intervention focus. When the class median achieves mastery level for each focused intervention the class moves forward to the next focused intervention, regardless if each individual student has achieved mastery level and in some instances instructional level. Participants in this study included a group of six second grade students who have been unable to consistently obtain Spring Math instructional target scores. During this study, students participated in thirty minutes of in-person small group instruction four times a week, one day of fifteen-minute virtual small group instruction, and completed their weekly whole class Spring Math assessment four times a week. Small group instruction was student-centered with playing cards being used as manipulatives to teach addition and subtraction facts through card games. Each participant received a deck of playing cards and game instructions to use as homework practice two times a week. During this study Spring Math scores and completion of homework were recorded weekly. Student’s participation and correct answers during small group instruction were recorded daily. After the study participant’s Spring Math scores were analyzed to determine the success of the small group instruction.

Presenters
KY

Kisha Young

Early Childhiood Education (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Examining the Effectiveness of the Developmental Spelling Program Words Their Way
This research project addresses the effectiveness of the word study program, Words Their Way. The program was implemented in a third grade classroom in the York Suburban School District during the 2020-2021 school year.

Presenters
MH

Michelle Huffer

Early Childhood Education (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

PDS Action Research Project
An inquiry question is developed about one aspect of instruction. The inquiry is researched and a plan is developed for the instructional methods that will be used. Artifacts and data will be collected.

Presenters
HS

Hannah Scholl

Early Childhood Education (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Post-Secondary Outcomes for Individuals with Down Syndrome
Educators and other helping professionals often find it challenging to prepare individuals with severe disabilities for future possible employment after high school. In this presentation, we will share the results of literature reviews on employment for people with autism, Down syndrome, and intellectual disabilities. Recommendations to support positive employment outcomes for individuals with severe disabilities will be discussed, with emphasis on how future educators could best support individuals with severe disabilities in this area.

Presenters
CH

Cara Haley

Early Childhood Education (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Supporting Employment for Individuals with Severe Disabilities
Educators and other helping professionals often find it challenging to prepare individuals with severe disabilities for future possible employment after high school. In this presentation, we will share the results of literature reviews on employment for people with autism, Down syndrome, and intellectual disabilities. Recommendations to support positive employment outcomes for individuals with severe disabilities will be discussed, with emphasis on how future educators could best support individuals with severe disabilities in this area.

Presenters
AV

Amanda VanOverbeke

Early Childhood Education (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

The Impact of Goal Setting on Second Grade Students
Second grade students are at a critical turning point in their academic journey as they prepare for the rigor of third grade where they will begin standardized testing. One way educators can support these students in taking responsibility for their education and building their academic confidence is through the use of goal setting. This study aims to bring to light the benefits of goal setting for second grade students in the context of mathematics. Through this study, I will be looking at the improvement of academic achievement in a class of second grade students by implementing goal setting sheets and having goal meetings with the students. These components will be put into place with this group of students in hopes that they can take these skills with them and apply it to the rest of their academic journey as well as their everyday lives as a means to improve achievement and increase self-efficacy.

Presenters
SD

Samantha De Leo

Early Childhood Education (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

The Outdoor Classroom and Learning Gardens Project
Presenters will discuss their experiences in developing a gardens curriculum for an outdoor learning center. Best practices that foster a generation of sustainability stewards by developing curriculum that connects communities and school with a focus on sustainability, equity and access will further be explored.

Presenters
NS

Nicole Sander

Early Childhood Education (BSE)
CR

Claire Robinson

Early Childhood Education (BSE)
CH

Cara Haley

Early Childhood Education (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Fracture Analysis of Drill Core from Pennsylvania’s Piedmont and Valley and Ridge Provinces
It is vital to understand the physical properties of the ground before construction because the properties of the subsurface can lead to slope instability, uneven compaction, and water infiltration of the near-surface rock. These can cause foundation issues, which would result in the failure of the structures.
Natural fractures are an important geologic feature because their mechanical and hydrological properties influence the sub surface’s behavior. Fractures within rocks allow for the dispersion of mechanical stresses and the transmission of fluids. Because of this, fractures must be investigated as part of a complicated geotechnical investigation of the ground’s mechanical and hydrologic properties whenever a new construction project begins.
Pennsylvania has varying geology, and there is a broadly insufficient understanding of subsurface fracture behavior in the six physiographic provinces found within the state. Research needs to be done in all the state’s provinces to develop a comprehensive understanding of the naturally occurring fractures and their impact on ground properties, like stability and water infiltration.
This research intends to attain greater foundational knowledge of the subsurface by analyzing fractures in the near-surface rock in two of Pennsylvania’s physiographic provinces. The research will contain fracture analysis of four drill cores, which will be compared to the rock type and stress regimes of the physiographic provinces in which they are found. The goal of this work is to develop a model to allow for more accurate and efficient geotechnical modeling of the near-surface rock in the future.

Presenters
TG

Timothy Garner

Geology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Long Island, New York Buoy 44025: Nor’easters
The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) collects data from a series of buoys around the United States. From this data collection, the question was is it possible to find Nor’easters over the ocean when they go through an area near the coast. To do this, Google Colaboratory was used—more specifically Python. This is when the location of Long Island, New York was selected to be the research target. From buoy station 44025, data from meteorological and ocean data was pulled from the archives and analyzed. The main parameters in question were wind speed and wave height. These are the two that show when big storms go through an area. From numerous graphs, it is possible to determine when a Nor’easter or other big weather events go through a region based of data collected over the ocean. This project focused in on the time between 2010 – 2020. The next big thing in question is if there is a climate aspect in this project. This will result data being pulled from the 1990 to present data. The goal of this will be to determine if there has been an increase or decrease in storm, as well as an increase or decrease in storm strength.

Presenters
MT

Marissa Tripus

Ocean Science & Coastal Studies (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Implications of the Trump Administration 2018 Foreign Policy Decision Regarding the Kurdish Situation in North-Western Syria
Threaded within the contours of the Middle East lies one of the most complicated cases cultural interaction in a contemporary sense: the stateless Kurds. Within this research project, the perception in which this crisis is interpreted between the Kurdish population and the Turkish population within the Middle East is explored. Although the intercultural crisis has occurred for decades, a new chapter unfolded within the duration of the Trump administration. Within the previous year, the diplomatic interactions between the United States and the Kurdish population have deteriorated quite rapidly. Consequently, the Kurds who are at a greater risk of state violence have suffered the after-effects of President Trump’s cultural negligence to sever support with the Kurds within Syria. Various states within the region have a complicated relationship with the Kurds, which adds to the difficulty of the situation; these state relationships to the Kurdish population will be addressed and analyzed as an additional perspective of the crisis.

Presenters
KD

Kristina Diefenderfer

Emergency Management (MS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

A Vonnegutian Exploration of Truth, Meaning, and the Human Condition
Kurt Vonnegut, one of America’s most prolific authors—and perhaps one of the most difficult to categorize—possessed the unique ability to express simply the complexities of human life. While Vonnegut often reveals the chaos and absurdity of reality by imagining the darkest and most disconcerting experiences humanity may face, underlying all of his works is an undeniably humanist ethos. Despite this, Vonnegut is often labeled a fatalistic pessimist, a cynic, and a nihilist. By closely examining his novels The Sirens of Titan, Cat’s Cradle, and Slaughterhouse-Five, I propose that Vonnegut, although critical of humanity, warns against embracing the belief that human life is futile and instead advocates for the potential good of humanity.

Presenters
HH

Haley Huffman

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Accessing Information: A Comparison of Media Ethics
This project will explore two books: The Four Theories of the Press and This is Not Propaganda as well as academic articles. In doing this, I will compare and contrast how media has been run in the past and how it is being run today in an attempt to analyze if history is repeating itself or if the media industry is changing for the better. I plan on backing the comparisons and the conclusion with evidence from academic articles and journals.

Presenters
EH

Emily Hyser

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

An Analysis of Freshwater by Akwaeke Emzi
An Analysis of Freshwater by Akwaeke Emzi

Presenters
BL

Brittney Love

English (BSE)
HS

Hannah Stroble

English (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Creative Project “To Sleep”
This is a creative project, and is a innovative and experimental writing piece called a hybrid text. This means it is one story told through a variety of genres (drawings, poetry, and prose). I was inspired by Shakespeare, so the title is a shoutout to one of his works, and the story itself is the fictional telling of the story of a girl completely through her dreams. Inspiration came from a bit of innovative and experimental genres, along with works produced underneath them. It was inspired by postmodern writing (such as poetry by Charles Olsen), a bit of projective verse and BEAT style, surrealism and modernism, procedurals, hybrid texts such as "The Collected Works of Billy the Kid", and many experimental pieces of writing that appear in the collected works of "Experimental Literature." The most interesting part of a hybrid text, which I would like to focus on, as I will focus on a forward about the research which has gone into the piece, and an afterword of its usefulness in my academic and professional career, is that such a piece, all within itself, showcases a variety of my skills throughout different genres. As I am a writing studies concentration, this is helpful in showcasing a variety of my writing styles within one example, and would therefore be a great addition to a professional portfolio.

Presenters
LF

Leah Freeman

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Digital Portfolio
The aspect of my presentation will be a discussion of a digital portfolio as a whole. I will be using my own examples I have curated for my own eportfolio. The project will prepare students for their professional careers or graduate school.

Presenters
MW

Madisen Wingert

Speech Communication (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Digital Portfolio
A professional portfolio is a compilation of documents and artifacts that showcase your experience, skills, interests, qualifications, and professional goals. The portfolio will consist of a Homepage, About Me page, Resume, and Writing samples.

Presenters
BM

Bryan Malone

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Digital Portfolio Creation Benefits
This presentation will discuss the digital portfolio project, the process of creating a digital portfolio and samples from our personal portfolios. In our research we will break down the benefits of digital portfolios when seeking out a post graduate career or higher education.

Digital portfolios provide more insight into what their future employee may look like and get an idea of what they bring to the table. The digital portfolio is used to give employers more than just a resume to look at when determining if they should hire you. Digital portfolios are one place to house all of your best works, resume, and info about you.

Presenters
KB

Kathryn Bremble

English (BA)
KW

Kaitlyn Weller

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Ecclesiastes and The Tempest: The Preacher’s Influence on Shakespeare
This paper was published in MUsings 2020: The Graduate Journal and received the Huzzard Award from the English Department.

Presenters
ML

Mariah Lynch

English (MA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Film Analysis: Moonlight
My project is an analysis of masculinity in the film Moonlight. I provide commentary on scenes in the movie and explain how the characters portray masculinity.

Presenters
SM

Sam Martello

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Font Fanzine
Font Fanzine is a 4-page newsletter spread detailing the impacts of fonts in writing, the psychology of fonts, and the difference between different font typefaces.


You’re at home reading your favorite academic journal. It addresses a recent discovery of a bacteria found along the ridges of camera lenses on cell phones. When in contact with skin, this bacteria can cause an itchy red rash that can last up to three weeks. Fear takes over your gaze. As your eyes are scanning down the article in hopes that your phone is not infected, something catches your eye. Out of nowhere, something scarier than the information before you appears: Comic Sans MS. The author of the journal switches from documenting their information using the classic font Times New Roman and switches to the playful Comic Sans font. You can no longer continue taking this academic journal seriously. Is this a joke? It isn’t. This is very real. This is font mood connotation. Font mood connotation is used to describe the subconscious emotions we inherently associate with a certain font. The psychology of font choices is real and it exists in the choices we make when writing.

Presenters
MM

Molly Merson

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

How Digital Portfolios can be Useful in Different Disciplines
The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the wide and beneficial use that digital portfolios have across multiple disciplines. Digital portfolios have a wide range of use and are capable of being applied across multiple disciplines and applied towards an abundant number of careers. What we aim to do is to show the benefit that anyone in any field can garner when utilizing a digital portfolio.

Presenters
XD

Xavier Dillingham

English (BA)
ML

Molly Landfried

English (BA)
AR

Abigail Risser

English (BA)
KR

Kateryna Rebensky

English (BA)
AW

Amber Warren

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

How the Columbian Exchange Changed the Diet of Europeans and Fueled the Industrial Revolution
My project is on how the Columbian exchange changed the diets of Europeans and fueled the Industrial Revolution. Many of the common foods eaten today in Europe were not available to Europeans living before the advent of the Columbian exchange in 1492. Crops such as potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, maize, tobacco, coco, and coffee are native to the Americas and were only introduced to Europeans after 1492. These foods- such as tomatoes and potatoes- are foods that most modern people view as staples of European diets. However, they did not exist in Europe until the 16th century. In fact, both potatoes and tomatoes were actually welcomed with suspicion when they were first introduced to Europeans. It was not until the late 18th century that potatoes were enthusiastically included in European diets, and it was not until tomatoes became popular in the United States that they became a popular foodstuff in Europe. The adoption of crops from the Columbian exchange led to a more robust European population. Europeans were better nourished and experienced less incidences of starvation. This also significantly facilitated the start and continuation of the Industrial Revolution. In my presentation, I will also talk about why I am incorporating this paper in my digital portfolio.

Presenters
HS

Haley Schott

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Index Card Poetry
This project considers the messiness and authenticity of in the moment writing. It is a collection of poems, thoughts, doodles, and the like, all written on index cards. Index card poetry explores the idea of what writing can be when the pressure of quality and aesthetic is removed.

Presenters
MS

Morgan Slough

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Portfolios: A Wide Variety
This project will showcase a variety of samples that can be included in a digital portfolio. Samples will include select articles, creative pieces, pieces that illustrate editing skills, and pieces that include design elements. This will help students understand that a portfolio is a wide collection of pieces that are not restricted to one specific style of writing or media.

Presenters
KM

Katelin McDougald

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)
ML

Michelle Lepera

Early Childhood Education (BSE)
MN

Madelynne News

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Reflections on a Digital Portfolio
Employers and admissions offices are increasingly asking for evidence of skills, ability, passion, and knowledge when students apply for a job or a graduate program. A digital portfolio is a convenient, creative, and effective way to house a living resume that consists of samples, artifacts, and past projects. This presentation will feature a few samples from my own digital portfolio with reflections on how each sample highlight my work ethic and research interests.

Presenters
RH

Rachel Hicks

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

The Kite Runner
An Analysis of The Kite Runner

Presenters
SS

Samickshya Subedi

Biology (BS)
AU

Apsara Uprety

English (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

The Power of Non-Western Literatures
Three Videos to Watch

Several student group projects will explore major themes in selected works of non-Western literatures of the 20th and 21st centuries through the lens of postcolonial studies . Analyzing books by authors from Nigeria, Egypt and Afghanistan, students will place them in their cultural and historical contexts and also demonstrate what American audiences can learn from them.

Presenters
BL

Brittney Love

English (BSE)
HS

Hannah Stroble

English (BSE)
SS

Samickshya Subedi

Biology (BS)
AU

Apsara Uprety

English (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

The Production of an Online Portfolio and its Effects on a Future Job Search in Education
For my Digital Portfolio class, I am required to present something related to said subject matter, and have elected to, instead of simply presenting a single artifact of my future portfolio, show off how one goes about constructing such a thing, examples of the pieces I might showcase in my own portfolio, and how all these pieces come together to, in some way, aid me in my search for employment in the education sphere in my near future.

Presenters
AC

Aaron Cook

English (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

The Use and Abuse of the Oxford Comma
The Use and Abuse of the Oxford Comma is an article about the history and modern use of the Oxford comma and by extension punctuation in general. This article gives a brief overview of punctuation history from the first use of the comma to a recent court case that hinges on the use of an oxford comma. A controversial topic for some, the oxford comma represents the flexibility of punctuation in the English language. Whether to use for a meme or in formal papers, oxford commas make for a fun point of punctuation.

Presenters
GL

Grace Long

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Woman at Point Zero, A Presentation
An Analysis of Woman at Point Zero

Presenters

Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video
  English

8:05am EDT

Virtual Persona and Gaming Communities: Player Interactions in Role-Playing Games
Role-playing games (RPGs) are games where the player participants assume the roles of characters and collaboratively create stories. Players determine the actions of their characters based on their characterization and the actions succeed or fail according to a system of rules and guidelines. Keeping in line with the rules of the game, they may improvise freely; their choices shape the outcome and directions of the game. In interactable virtual mediums, such as video games and virtual reality (VR), players assume a virtual avatar and make choices within the bounds of the game to shape their avatar’s characterization. In massively-multiplayer online games (MMOs), it is almost essential for players to interact with other players and push the direction of the game further. While not entirely necessary from a game mechanic point of view, players will adopt virtual personas while interacting with other players as a means to enhance their own immersion within the game. Creating a virtual avatar with in-depth characterization fuels the player’s decisions in the game, and will dictate how the player is able to interact with other players.

Presenters
BT

Brandon Townsend

Entertainment Technology (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

American's Learning German: How Cultural Associations Affect Proclivity Towards German Language Learning
Foreign language departments have been decreasing in size in recent years. This study aims to determine how cultural associations affect motivation to, or to not, study German at the college level. The field of psycholinguistics encompasses research that takes a psychological perspective on foreign language learning. Previous studies have delved into motivation within the foreign language classroom, where as this study focuses on cultural associations that potentially affect enrollment in foreign language classes. Americans develop cultural associations from individual exposure to foreign language or culture. The result of which may affects one’s proclivity towards later foreign language learning. The survey gathers information regarding history of foreign language learning before college and has open-ended questions for subjects to express their associations to the German language, German culture, and any potential connection they may perceive towards German language, culture, or German-speaking countries.

Presenters
RJ

Rory Jester

German (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Winter Storm Orlena: An Analysis of the Impacts of Changing Precipitation with Atmospheric Conditions
Winter Storm Orlena, a large Nor’easter containing strong winds and heavy snow, caused disastrous impacts across the Tri-State area, as well as the northeast United States from January 31, 2020 to February 3, 2021. The storm contained different precipitation conditions, with many areas receiving changes between snow and a wintry mix (i.e. freezing rain and sleet) a few times a day. The atmospheric conditions throughout the storm were a factor in changing the precipitation type and creating the dangerous hazards left by Orlena. Using photo-imagery of the changing ice aggregates, weather station data will be compared to the different types of precipitation that occurred, and will be analyzed to gain a better understanding of the impacts of rapid changing winter weather conditions.

Presenters
CG

Cameron Gonteski

Meteorology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Carving Out A Career in Sports Journalism: A Personal Collection of Writing and Interviews
With a passion for sports journalism, I've spent the last four years improving my writing skills and gaining invaluable experience as an amateur sports reporter with the Hershey Bears hockey team. Through my four years at Millersville, I've been able to better my writing and apply it to the work I've done outside of college. As my portfolio continues to grow, I hope to showcase the work I've done, the experience I've gained, and recognize professors that helped me improve as a writer during my time at Millersville University.

Presenters
DS

Dean Snock

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Devin Robinson Portfolio
A presentation of a Portfolio comprising of works from my time at Millersville.

Presenters
DR

Devin Robinson

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Eyewitness Event Article - Flyers vs. Jets
I want to talk about a Philadelphia Flyers game that I attended and covered a play-by-play article on in March of 2020, right before the COVID pandemic hit. I covered this event for an assignment for ENGL315 Advanced Reporting. I wrote an article of a hockey game between the Philadelphia Flyers and the Winnipeg Jets and I believe it is a good example of how to cover a sports event and highlight the important aspects of a game. I think this article represents some of my best work in covering a sporting event so I would be very comfortable discussing it.

Presenters
ZT

Zack Todd

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Sustainable Composites LLC Rejuvenating Wasted Leather
For my COMM 326 class our assignment was to create a story involving sustainability. The catch was that it had to be local to Lancaster. Our project was going to be published on ProjectGreenLancaster on the Millersville University website. For my piece, I found a company called Sustainable Composites LLC, where they take scraped leather and refurbish it into quality products such as wallets, belts, bags, and other products. I had the chance to interview the founders of Sustainable Composites LLC for my story. This project is a way to demonstrate my journalism skills with my interview with the founders as well as my ability to create and write a story.

Presenters
JS

Jordan Satterfield

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Now We're Stressed Out: The Stress of a Student and its Long Term Effects
Stress is not new to students, especially those who make it to college. Time and time again, students are told to just get through classes and deal with the stress they face. Insight of the widespread stress in students, no one stops and thinks about what stress does to students. Instead, it is normalized. How does stress affect them long term? What kinds of other issues develop as coping mechanisms- drug use, alcohol use? And what can be done to combat this? Through the example of a music major, research, and analysis, the causes and justification of stress will be brought to question; as well as researched and proven ways to combat stress and preventative measures. Stress can directly be related to drug and alcohol usage, as well as the development of mental illnesses. These severe links make the conversation of stress and its impact so important.

Presenters

Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

A Systems- Level Approach for Mindfulness Training in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic
Research supports that mindfulness strategies are associated with enhanced well-being, decreased anxiety and improved relationship qualities. For the purpose of this assignment, mindfulness will be discussed in terms of where it comes from, what it represents, what it means and does, and how it is beneficial to people. A 12-week yoga intervention program, where students attended 45-minute mindfulness sessions four days a week will be explored and how this intervention could be useful for school professionals, specifically school psychologists. The role of a school psychologist in problem solving and systems level delivery will be discussed as well as the collaborative approach with other school professionals necessary for effective implementation. The results of this study exhibit positive impacts on problematic responses to stress including: emotional arousal, intrusive thoughts, and rumination. Additionally, teachers and administrators generally found positive outcomes in student behaviors in the classroom. Research such as this actively demonstrates the usefulness of mindfulness in schools at a systems-level and could be a valuable tool to battle student stress induced from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Presenters
SM

Sydney Murphy

School Psychology (M.Ed.)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

The Impact of Gratitude on Mindfulness in College Students
Gratitude involves appreciating what is valuable to oneself, and mindfulness entails being aware of what arises from non-judgmentally attending to the present moment. This study explored how gratitude may impact mindfulness in a sample of college students. Participants were randomly assigned to a group that engaged in daily gratitude journaling or to a control group who journaled daily about an arbitrary topic. Results suggested that self-reported mindfulness among participants who completed the gratitude exercise did not differ from the control group. Qualitatively, major themes of the gratitude journals reflected Maslow’s (1987) physiological and belongingness needs. Factors that may have contributed to a non-significant result are explored, and suggestions for future study are provided.

Presenters
BS

Brooke Shimer

Psychology (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Using the Classroom Check-Up Coaching Model to Increase Student Engagement During Virtual Learning
The purpose of this paper is to describe a graduate school psychology student’s consultation training case, using The Classroom Check-Up (CCU) Coaching model, delivered remotely. The CCU is a class-wide consultation model designed to address classroom management and student engagement, via the use of motivational interviewing and a problem-solving process. The aim of the CCU with this third-grade teacher was to improve student engagement in her virtual classroom. The steps of the CCU process will be outlined. The consultant observed the virtual classroom over a three-day period. Feedback was given to the teacher regarding her strengths and areas of concern. Two interventions were implemented; the use of a random name generator strategy to call on different students and the use of group contingencies with specific praise to increase the percentage of students engaged. The consultant monitored the interventions for the first week of implementation, followed by the teacher monitoring for the remainder of the semester. Performance feedback showed that both student engagement and opportunities to respond increased during times of indirect instruction.

Presenters
KS

Katherine Schoener

School Psychology (MS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Utilizing the Classroom Check-Up Model via Tele-Consultation to increase Opportunities to Respond in Virtual and Hybrid Learning
The purpose of this case study was for a graduate school psychology consultant-in-training to get experience using consultation models during the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to social distancing precautions, the consultation case was conducted via tele-consultation to support a high school teacher in increasing the engagement of students in online and hybrid instruction. The Classroom Check Up Model (Reinke et al., 2008) was applied. Through a problem-solving process, structured observations, and the use of motivational interviewing, we were able to produce an intervention targeting opportunities to respond (OTR’s). Data was graphed and showed an increase in OTR’s. Lessons learned and implications for future tele-coaching will be discussed.

Presenters
SW

Sadie Wentland

School Psychology (M. Ed.)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

A Social Problem and Policy Exploration of Housing Discrimination
This paper was published in MUsings 2021: The Graduate Journal.

Presenters
CL

Channel Lowery

Social Work (MSW)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Advocating for Foster Care Youth in Higher Education
This paper was published in MUsings 2021: The Graduate Journal.

Presenters
AD

Ashly Duin

Social Work (MSW)
AG

Abby Gabner

Social Work (MSW)
JH

Josefa Hernandez

Social Work (MSW)
DH

Danielle Hornung

Social Work (MSW)
DM

Danielle McFadien

Social Work (MSW)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

8:05am EDT

Gamification of Learning for Library Student Employees
This research project is the curricular design and creation of gamified learning modules for the training of student employees in McNairy Library’s Digital Learning Studio (DLS). The purpose of this curriculum is to create a consistent and engaging training program that develops and improves the learners’ skills for performing tasks in their position and the skill sets that can take them into the next stage of their career. At present, DLS student employees receive some training from their supervisor, the Learning Technologies Librarian, and some from their peers who have previous experience. Training typically takes place through observational learning and peer mentoring. It was determined existing training was not consistent and student employees could benefit from an expansion of content to improve their customer interaction, technical, critical thinking and problem-solving skills. This technical research and design project was the creation of a three-phase plan to implement the training, a curriculum for phase one, and the creation of a gamified learning framework designed in D2L.

Presenters
KA

Kimberly Auger

Technology and Innovation (M.Ed.)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 8:05am - 5:00pm EDT
MU Video

9:25am EDT

"Chunking" Summative Assessments
Currently in my placement, each unit ends with two summative assessments. The first is through a program called Quizizz and acts as a study guide for students to use in order to get ready for the test and the second one is the test itself. In the first unit I created for placement, I have divided up the topics so that the one big Quizizz can be broken up into five smaller ones. Each topic in this unit will be treated as its own mini unit and will end with part of their once comprehensive review. In the end of the unit, students will have completed the exact same Quizizz, just in a different manor. They will still have access to their five Quizizz for test preparation and will still be taking the same test. It is my hope that when compared with other units, their test scores improve.

Presenters
HB

Howard Brosnan

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Education

9:25am EDT

Literature of Witnessing
The role of literature during challenging times is to bear witness to history in the making. In this panel presentation students will share their creative projects in various literary genres, all carrying the common theme of "witnessing." Some projects will respond to current events: the pandemic and the current social or political issues. Other will respond to past authors who acted as witnesses to their times, including those who wrote about the Holocaust.

Presenters
YC

Yinghong Crone

English (BA)
TT

Tania Turner

English (BSE)
SG

Sydney Gant

English (BA)
MC

Morgan Chapman

Early Childhood Education (BSE)
EB

Erin Buchanan

Early Childhood Education (BSE)
ER

Elizabeth Rickrode

Biology (BSE)
JD

Jacob Dickens

English (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  English

9:25am EDT

NAGPRA: Repatriation of American Indian Ancestors and Funerary Artifacts in Higher Education
Since 1990, federal law has recognized the significance of repatriating American Indian human remains, funerary and sacred objects from European American museums and private collections back to their indigenous communities. This presentation gives an overview of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act -- its inception, its function, its application, its key figures. Also highlighted is how institutions of higher education have or have not responded to the repatriation orders under the law.

Presenters
JT

Jordan Traut

English (MA)
AB

Ann Burt

History (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  English

9:25am EDT

Debt-trap Diplomacy: Chinese Influence in Africa
China has grown exponentially in recent years, from the formation of the People’s Republic of China in 1949 struggling to pick up the pieces of a broken empire, to the world’s manufacturing capital and the world’s second largest economy. This newfound power has moved China to focus its attention outside its own borders. The CCP began efforts on expanding China’s influence worldwide with a focus on the developing world with initiatives like the Belt and Road Initiative. Africa has taken center stage in this initiative, which involves 39 African countries in debt to China resulting in defaulted loans and Chinese control of African infrastructures. This research project focuses on how China is using the Belt and Road Initiative to spread influence through debt-traps by addressing the question of is China using the Belt and Road Initiative to trap African countries into debt in order to increase their sphere of influence? For this project I utilized the Mills Method to focus on four cases of China’s investment and relationships in Africa. This project analyzes the Chinese debt-trap diplomacy to better understand whether China is increasing their sphere of influence and identify tactics used by the CCP to accomplish this goal.

Presenters
DM

David Milam

Government & Political Affairs (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  International Studies

9:25am EDT

Left Behind: How Bumiputera Laws Prevent Other Malaysians From Obtaining Higher Education
The New Economic Policy of 1970 in Malaysia and subsequent modifications of this policy have left large portions of the Malaysian population without the possibility of earning a higher education. The publicly funded system of higher education in Malaysia is flawed. The system gives preferential treatment to those who are considered Bumiputera over those who identify as a different ethnic group. The lack of funds and low acceptance rates at public universities have prevented people of non-Bumiputera ethnic groups from earning a degree, finding a higher paying job, and lifting themselves out of poverty. This study seeks to answer the question of how has the Bumiputera laws in Malaysia effected privatized education and enrollment across ethnic groups? To answer this question, I use primary source data made available by the Malaysian government, including economic averages based upon cultural and ethnic groups. This existing bias in education has created an underqualified workforce graduating from a numbers-based admissions tertiary system. The problems created by this numbers-based system have continued into the private sector of tertiary education; fueling high tuition costs that have limited approximately 2,000,000 households in seeking higher education.

Presenters
BD

Brandon Downey

International Studies (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  International Studies

9:25am EDT

Modern Challenges in the Developing World
This panel addresses important modern challenges in the developing world. The papers in this panel deal specifically with some of the more important modern challenges in Northeast and Southeast Asia and Eastern Europe. The first study investigates the African debt trap caused by China’s investment in the Belt and Road Initiative. The second study examines the economic rise of Vietnam in modern Southeast Asia. The third study investigates the role of state-sanctioned aggression towards ethnic groups in Myanmar. The fourth study explores how laws institutionalize inequality in Malaysia. The final study probes the relationship between education and political pessimism in modern Serbia.

Presenters
DM

David Milam

Government & Political Affairs (BA)
YS

Yorlin Susana

International Studies (BA)
CO

Carly ONeill

Media Arts Production (BS)
BD

Brandon Downey

International Studies (BA)
BS

Bojana Stankov

International Studies (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  International Studies

9:25am EDT

Political Pessimism in Serbia: Mill’s Method on Interaction Between Education and Political Pessimism
Why are citizens in some countries politically pessimistic? To answer this question, it is important to understand the impact of education on political pessimism and Serbia represents an excellent case. This study seeks to answer the question of how education interacts with political pessimism across the regions in Serbia and I propose that the more educated people are, the more likely they will hold pessimistic sentiments. I use both quantitative and qualitative data to answer this question. Quantitative data was collected through World Value Survey Wave 5 from 2005 as the most recent data available for Serbia. Qualitative data is collected through purposively selected interviews in the northern region of Serbia called Vojvodina, in the summer of 2020. In-depth interviews are necessary to understand the sentiments that people of Serbia may hold towards politics and are essential to this study that attempts to explain people’s pessimistic political attitudes. The advantages of my case selection are that it captures the experiences of ordinary educated Serbian people who had witnessed the fall of the autocracy in 2000.

Presenters
BS

Bojana Stankov

International Studies (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  International Studies

9:25am EDT

State Sanctioned Aggression towards Ethnic Groups in Myanmar
Myanmar is home to 135 different ethnic groups that have been involved in one of the world’s longest on-going civil wars. Myanmar has experienced violence between the Muslims and the Buddhists since 1942. The Burmese view the Rohingya people, a Muslim group, as foreigners who illegally settled in Arakan province from Bangladesh and believe they are in the country illegally. Multiple prominent reports suggest the Myanmar security forces are committing human rights violations towards several of its minority groups, including the Rohingya Muslims. This study examines if Myanmar is applying state sanctioned bias towards non-indigenous ethnic groups by answering the question of how a group’s indigenous or non-indigenous status to Myanmar affects whether they are targeted by state sanctioned aggression. I use the Mill’s Method to analyze four ethnic groups in Myanmar and whether each of them are indigenous to Myanmar and experiencing high or low state sanctioned aggression. The importance of this study is to bring awareness to the human rights violations that are taking place within Myanmar and show how China is enabling the government's actions.

Presenters
CO

Carly ONeill

Media Arts Production (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  International Studies

9:25am EDT

The Secret to Success: Vietnam’s Secret to Rapid Modernization and Development
The Southeast Asian region is one where many of its countries suffer from extreme poverty. Many countries in this region could easily be classified as undeveloped. However, when it comes to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, there is a certain secret that they have been using to help boost themselves to the title of developing nation. This study investigates the reforms that the Vietnamese government enacted in order to get their country on the path to becoming a developed one. I use the Mill’s Method in order to compare Vietnam’s political and economic reforms with those of other Southeast Asian countries. The results of my study yield important information as to what Vietnam has done in order to, metaphorically speaking, pull itself up from its bootstraps and start the journey of modernization and development. This study can also be a useful reference for other countries, not just Southeast Asian countries, to see what works and does not work when it comes to beginning the transition to a developed country.

Presenters
YS

Yorlin Susana

International Studies (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  International Studies

9:25am EDT

A Classroom in Perfect Harmony: The Educator’s Role in Promoting Student Wellbeing in the Vocal Music Classroom
The need to create a positive learning environment is critical in all classrooms. Research studies demonstrate that singing in the presence of others is a vulnerable thing to do, thus the importance of creating a safe and encouraging learning environment in the choral classroom is crucial. While wellbeing in the classroom is a widely discussed topic among researchers, educators, and administrators, little has been connected to Edward Deci’s self-determination theory, a macro theory of human motivation and personality that concerns people's inherent growth tendencies and innate psychological needs. This project examines how educators can promote student wellbeing by addressing these three psychological needs, autonomy, competence, and relatedness, in their classroom environment, classroom management, and teaching strategies. Oral history interviews gave vocal music educators the opportunity to reflect on how they contribute to a learning environment that promotes student wellbeing. The implications of these interviews stress the importance for vocal music educators to develop students’ self-confidence, motivation, and connection to others to best promote student wellbeing.

Presenters
EE

Elise Eggleston

Music (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Music

9:25am EDT

Can You Hear Colors? An Exploration of the Cognitive Effects of Synesthesia on Musicians.
Synesthesia, a neurological condition that effects the senses, allows around four percent of the population to experience the world in seemingly incomprehensible ways. It has been found that artists, such as musicians, may be more likely to have this condition due to their innate aesthetic sensitivity, though very few studies examine how this effected their views on music or how it facilitates or impedes their artistry. By using oral history methodology, a method that allows participants to freely share their own experiences with the condition, several interviews showed many differing relationships between synesthesia and musical backgrounds. It was also discovered that while there seems to be a connection between how synesthesia effects musicians' daily lives and their understanding of music, as well as several connections between the musicians themselves, there is a different response by each musician. Because their personal experiences showed a varied range of reactions, the question remains open.

Presenters
KP

Kaitlyn Pekarik

Music (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Music

9:25am EDT

“It started out like a song”: A contextualized musical analysis of Stephen Sondheim’s most pivotal works of the 1980s.
Stephen Sondheim is often praised as one of the most prolific and exceptional musical theater composers of the 20th Century. In 1981, Stephen Sondheim experienced the biggest failure of his career with his passion project, Merrily We Roll Along. A few years following, he emerged back on the scene with a new writing partner James Lapine to write Sunday in the Park with George. This was a pivotal shift in Sondheim’s career so comparing these two musicals could give lots of insight into Sondheim’s musical development. This project will investigate these two works as equals and reveal Sondheim’s musical and thematic elements within them. I am using musical analysis methodology to allow the music to speak for itself and reveal the connections between the two larger works. Stephen Sondheim is a very unique composer, so a musical analysis has to be performed through many different lenses. While Sondheim employs a lot of common practice techniques when composing, perhaps the most effective way to view his music is through the emotions behind it. Despite these two musicals being written in two different compositional styles, the way that Sondheim is able to convey emotion stays consistent. His use of pedal point, bimodality, effect chords, and voice leading all seem to attempt to convey the emotion of that specific moment. Learning how and why brilliant composers create their work is a key element in the creation of new and exciting art. This project will supply musicians, composers, and educators with a prime example of how an artist was able to express his art freely and effectively.

Presenters
NM

Noah Manno

Music (BSE)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 9:25am - 10:40am EDT
Live Zoom Presentation

10:50am EDT

Development of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Training Modules
Industrial grade Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems and visualizations are becoming more powerful and user friendly. Creating these visualizations can now be streamlined and the learning curve has been significantly lowered due to more intuitive designer programs. Ignition is one of these programs and allows for individuals to quickly create powerful and intuitive Human Machine Interface (HMI) screens to observe and control industrial processes. Using the Ignition program, along with supporting hardware, devices can be brought into educational settings cheaply and effectively. In collaboration with team members, I will create labs that walk students through the setup of Ignition to control existing robotic armatures found in the Osburn Automation lab at Millersville U

Presenters
EB

Eathyn Brennan

Applied Engineering and Technology Management (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 10:50am - 12:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation

10:50am EDT

Vaping Habits of College Students
Although the first electronic cigarette-like device was patented in the 1930s, the electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) seen today did not penetrate the US market until 2006. Before the emergence of ENDS, nicotine use had plummeted, but the invention and popularization of vapes caused its nationwide resurgence. While ENDS were originally purposed to help smokers quit cigarettes and eventually nicotine altogether, a troubling demographic of vape users is Gen Z, or those born between 1995-2015; currently, most studies focus on middle school and high school students. We developed a survey to uncover student opinions on vaping, as well as to quantify the frequency of vaping at the college level. In 2020, we recruited Millersville University students to complete the survey. Out of all responses (n=569), 41% of students have vaped, with 24% of all participants being active vapers. Additionally, we asked all respondents, regardless of vaping habit, if they would be less likely to vape if presented with information regarding the effects of vaping. We discovered, if presented with that information, those who do not vape are much more likely to not vape in the future (78%; n=435) than those who actively vape (40%; n=134). The data from this survey suggest that students must be educated on vaping, and educated before they start vaping, in order for them to make informed decisions on the effects of vaping on their bodies.

Presenters
OM

Olivia Medina

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 10:50am - 12:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Biology

10:50am EDT

The Effects of Video Games on Kids
Video Games are becoming the biggest part of teenagers and kids lives today. So its important to think about some of the negative effects that some of the games that have violence have on them. I wanted to pursue this because there are multiple ways to pursue this topic and I'm excited to dive into it.

Presenters
JS

Justin Stitz

Speech Communication (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 10:50am - 12:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Communication

10:50am EDT

Sensor Integration in Mathematical Modeling
The increased affordability of microcontrollers and their ever-smaller components are leveling the playing field for any lay person to collect experimental data. Using an Arduino microcontroller and an array of sensors, students and teachers can replicate a number of important experiments studied in undergraduate Ordinary Differential Equations. In this project I will demonstrate the use of DS18B20 digital temperature, ultra-sonic, Infrared obstacle avoidance sensor, and laser module to measure independent variables in important mathematical models.

I will be showing how sensor data collected for Newton’s Law Of Cooling, Newton’s Second Law Of Motion For Free Fall, and Hooke’s Law, can be interpreted with the aid of a computer. I will also utilize the visual and symbolic understanding of Mathematica software to demonstrate plotting and visualizing this data. It is the hope of this presenter to demonstrate how exploring these technology based experiments will nourish student’s curiosity and better facilitate STEM Education.

Presenters

Tuesday April 13, 2021 10:50am - 12:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Mathematics

10:50am EDT

Investigation of Correlation between Solar Activity and Total Lightning Count
This investigation builds on earlier works that suggest possible links between cosmic ray (Scott, et al.,
2014; Chronis, 2008; Harrison and Usoskin, 2010). Cosmic ray intensity increases during solar minima
when the heliospheric protection is weak. At the same time, during periods of solar maxima ionization
rates increase, and induced currents and electric fields strengthen. How each of these variations in solar
activity affect lightning counts is not well understood. The correlation between lightning and solar
activity will be investigated over a solar maxima and minima centered at the years of 2000-2005 (Solar
Max) and 2006-2011 (Solar Min). Daily counts of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning strokes obtained from
the Vaisala’s ground lighting detection system will be statistically analyzed for correlation with sunspot
numbers (Index), using the latter as a proxy indicator of solar activity. The Sunspot data will be
downloaded from the World Data Center Sunspot Index and Long-term Solar Observations (WDC-SILSO)
web site. The study will examine differences in lightning counts between solar maxima and minima over
a 700,000 km2 area covering the north-central plains of the U.S. The area is selected because of its
northern location closer to the north geomagnetic pole and in proximity to solar storms, and because
thunderstorm climatology predicts 40-50 thunderstorm-days per year, greater than any other northern
U.S. latitude.

Presenters
SR

Samuel Reams

Meteorology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 10:50am - 12:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Meteorology

12:05pm EDT

Religion, Death, Life and family in Small Greek Villages
Religion is an important part in Greek life, from their yearly celebration of firewalking to turning to their faith after the death of a family member. Each of our five books cover different aspects of Greek life in small villages in the Mediterranean. In our presentation we will be discussing daily life in these small villages, covering religion, death, family and their overall lives in these rural villages.

Presenters
AB

Ann Burt

History (BA)
CP

Connor Pearson

Anthropology (BA)
EM

Emma Moyer

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)
KM

Keilyn Morales

Anthropology (BA)
KF

Kaylee Ferree

Psychology (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Anthropology

12:05pm EDT

Spain Is Different
This presentation will be an overview of Spanish culture throughout different groups in Spain. Different geographical regions all have different customs, beliefs, and traditions. This presentation examines and focuses on the micro-cultures. Topics included are ;death and funeral rights in the village of Murelaga, how war affected a village called Venavarre , how the world should communicate from those in Spain, the village Andalusia and what their beliefs are, marginalized culture of the villagers Pasiegos.

Presenters
AM

Alexis Maus

Anthropology (BA)
JB

Jonathan Bracero

Anthropology (BA)
RB

Rebecca Brommer

Anthropology (BA)
NB

Natalie Beltran

Anthropology (BA)
HR

Holly Rutherford

Anthropology (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Anthropology

12:05pm EDT

Exogenesis Symphony
This watercolor series is based on the three part symphony by the band Muse, entitled Exogenesis. For each part of the symphony (Overture, Cross-Pollination, and Redemption), I have created four watercolor paintings that embody the tone, theme, and mood of these songs, resulting in a twelve part series. Muse's Exogenesis Symphony tells the story of humanity leaving a destroyed Earth behind to populate elsewhere in the universe. Through abstract, non-referential paintings relying heavily on movement, line, and color, I have conveyed the tragedy of the Exogenesis Symphony.

Presenters

Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Art & Design

12:05pm EDT

Mosquitofish Social Networking
Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) form shoals in which interactions can be examined as social networks. Social networks form the connection between individual behavior and group dynamics and can influence how information and diseases spread. While the presence of social networks in animal groups is well established, how these relationships form is not well understood. I am examining how individual characteristics influence social status and network structure. To do this, we established sixteen groups composed of five female Gambusia, and observed them twice weekly, for thirty minutes over three weeks. I hypothesize that size differences will determine dominance relationships, which will in turn determine network structure.

Presenters
LS

Leilani Smith

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Biology

12:05pm EDT

Structure of Social Interactions of Female Mosquitofish When in the Presence of a Potential Mate
Animal interactions with one in social groups are often associated with other aspects of an organism’s biology and ecology. We investigate the role of size in female Eastern mosquito fish, Gambusia holbrooki, in determining how interactions were influenced, and influenced with a male mosquito fish. Males in this species- utilize coercive strategies in order to mate; females typically avoid or attack coercive males, and we predict their size may influence 1) which females are approached by males, and 2) how females respond to a male’s advances. We hypothesized there would be more frequent mating attempts towards, and increased aggression from, larger females. Alternatively, smaller females may be less socially connected and thus face more frequent mating attempts by males.

Presenters
HB

Haley Beck

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Biology

12:05pm EDT

The Effects of Social Dynamics on Antipredator Responses of Mosquitofish
Predation has critical fitness consequences for organisms, and antipredator behaviors are generally under strong selection. In the Eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, individuals commonly avoid predators, but at times may approach and "inspect" predators. We evaluated how social dynamics in mosquitofish influence their behavioral responses to the presence of a predator - the largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides. We hypothesized we would observe increased shoaling and predator inspection, typical antipredator responses in mosquitofish. We also predicted that less connected individuals in groups would be more likely to be preyed upon by the bass. To test this, we exposed each group to the bass, first in a confined area of the arena to monitor the social changes in response to the predator’s scent. The bass was then released to swim freely to observe the survival of each fish as they acted as prey.

Presenters
TY

Trinity Young

Biology (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Biology

12:05pm EDT

A Study of Computer-Generated Imagery (CGI) in Social Media Influencer Marketing
This study addresses the question of how computer-generated imagery (CGI) is changing the dynamics of social media influencer marketing. It observes the differences between traditional human influencer marketing and CGI influencer marketing through primary and secondary research. Influencer marketing is a form of marketing where influencers share promotional content for a brand/brands they are endorsed by with their niche audience. CGI influencers are a new type of influencer created with CGI to perform the same functions as human influencers, including participating in influencer marketing. Research on CGI influencers is limited, which makes the research conducted for this study meaningful.

Presenters
LS

Lydia Shaloka

Business Administration (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation

12:05pm EDT

Phatic Communication
The field of communication is full of an array of ideas. A topic I have been researching is Phatic Communication and why we use it. It serves a purpose in everyday society because everyone is using this form of communication. This is important to study because it would be good to know why society uses it so much and if it is good or bad to rely on in conversation. The goal of this research is to dig deeper into the reasoning behind the use of Phatic Communication and if it helps or hurts our everyday conversations. This research also looks into the reason that we possibly use this style of communication to better our face.

Presenters
DM

Daniela McCurdy

Media Arts Production (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Communication

12:05pm EDT

MU Student Citizen's Police Academy: Increasing Diversity in Policing
Few studies of police recruitment have investigated successful methods of recruiting women and people of color. This study follows the first ever Millersville University Student Citizen’s Police Academy, which took place in the fall of 2020, and aimed to interest students who are women and people of color in a career in law enforcement. This study examines whether the academy increased the participants’ interest in pursuing a career in law enforcement, whether the participants gained knowledge of the field, and if the academy influenced their perceptions of the policing profession. Participants completed a pre- and post-survey which allowed the authors to collect demographics from each participant, and quantitative data on whether participants’ knowledge, interest, and perceptions changed over the course of the academy. Our preliminary findings show that 90% of participants said they are more interested in a career in law enforcement than before attending the academy. The findings suggest that the participants’ self-identified knowledge of the law enforcement field and their interest in a career within law enforcement both increased by attending the Millersville University Student Citizen’s Police Academy. Findings suggest that different marketing strategies should be used to gain more participation from women and people of color.

Presenters
ER

Ellie Rohrback

Sociology (BA)
EW

Emma Wright

Sociology (BA)
MB

Mary Brogna

Psychology (BA)
DL

Destiny Lebron

Psychology (BA)
DL

Dave Lenig

Sociology (BA)
AC

Ana Carolina Munar

Technology and Innovation (M.Ed.)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation

12:05pm EDT

Paper Trails: Using letter writing to understand social isolation and poverty in a rural community.
Communities living in rural poverty experience social disconnection and isolation, especially amplified by the COVID-19 pandemic. Our research team explored intergenerational letter-writing as a response to isolation of people living in rural Lancaster County, PA. Letter writing was used as a qualitative research strategy to access the narratives of both individuals living in rural poverty and MU Undergraduate social work students in a freshman seminar course, who were paired as pen pals.

The letter-writing exchange enhanced students’ understanding of the daily experiences of individuals living in rural poverty. Data collected from letters demonstrated that social isolation remains a central concern among poor, rural residents. Letter writing supported a sense of personal connection between students and community members; these social connections may have attenuated the pain of social isolation that many community members experience.

Innovations in technology-based research strategies may lack the capacity to capture the complex, lived experiences of individuals and families living in rural poverty. Narrative inquiry and the use of letter writing as a research methodology allowed us access to greater understanding about the lived experience of rural poverty and access to rich, qualitative data. People living in rural poverty experience a layered isolation that keeps them separate from resources and each other. This realization requires innovative attention in both research and practice. This presentation will explore implications for practice and further research will be discussed.

Presenters
BL

Brittany Leffler

Social Work (MSW)
RP

Rachel Preibisch

Social Work (MSW)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 12:05pm - 1:05pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Social Work, MSW

1:10pm EDT

Promoting Self-Regulation During a Pandemic to Stay Academically Resilient
Students need to plan their time, monitor their progress, and reflect on the outcomes (Bol & Garner, 2011). Students must also remain motivated and engaged without any form of reinforcement (Delen & Liew, 2016). I found that asynchronous modality requires me to have the skills of self regulation where I am in control of my own teaching and learning at the same time! Self-regulation refers to self-generated thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that are oriented to attaining goals (Zimmerman, B., 2000).
Self-regulation skills are associated with academic resilience (Urasche et al., 2012) and students with better self-regulation skills are more resilient ( Blair & Raver, 2015). Self-regulation skills include the ability to avoid distractions, manage time, work towards achieving your goals and mastering the strategies of self-evaluation, organizing, goal setting, monitoring, and seeking assistance etc. These factors are critical to learning, and particularly during these virtual learning environments. Fortunately for me, I had mastered these skills before the pandemic having moved to the US as an immigrant with a refugee status. My journey had me develop strong resilience skills based on the challenges I had to overcome. The objectives of this presentation include;
Discuss the characteristics of a self regulated student
Discuss why planning and goal setting is critically important
Showcase what is needed in order to learn successfully
Explain why self regulation is an important element of academic resilience

Presenters
CK

Cedrick Kazadi

Computer Science (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 1:10pm - 2:25pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation

1:10pm EDT

It Takes a Village: A Look Into the Lives of Central Mediterranean Peoples
In “It Takes A Village'', four students from ANTH 223 explore life and culture in separate regions around the Mediterranean with information from four different ethnographies. Through cross cultural examination, we can compare and contrast different values in home life, religion, and personal relationships within each society.

Presenters
HW

Haidyn Weber

Anthropology (BA)
KW

Kaiya Weaver

Anthropology (BA)
MS

Makenzie Smith

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)
EU

Erica Urban

Anthropology (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 1:10pm - 2:25pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Anthropology

1:10pm EDT

Men and Women of Middle Eastern and North African Cultures / People and Cultures of the Mediterranean
This presentation is an anthropological exploration amongst both men and women of the three Middle-Eastern cultures including Iraq, Israel, and Egypt, while also stretching across Africa to compare and contrast with Moroccan culture. Similarities and differences as well as the individual characteristics of these groups are the focus, allowing us to delve into the rich cultures of these Nations. / These presentations provide an overview of Mediterranean cultures, which include cultures from Southern Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa.

Presenters
AG

Alyssa Gouldner

Anthropology (BA)
BW

Brooke Worrall

Anthropology (BA)
SB

Sam Botnick

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 1:10pm - 2:25pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Anthropology

1:10pm EDT

The Northeast Mediterranean and Cultures of Discontent
This presentation will explore the idea of Blood Feuds, and other aspects of life from the Balkans to Southern Anatolia. Using anthropological data collected in Montenegro and Turkey, along with examples of life in Turkish villages to explore life in the Northeast Mediterranean.

Presenters
AF

Alex Faulkner

Anthropology (BA)
CP

Chelyann Perez

International Studies (BA)
LB

Liz Beilecki

Anthropology (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 1:10pm - 2:25pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Anthropology

1:10pm EDT

Verbal Communication Between Personal Fitness Trainers and Professional Football Players: Final Research Proposal
This is my final research paper for COMM 301 for Dr. Yang. For this paper we had to find a research topic that we can study to find out how communication is used in that topic. For my essay I chose to use verbal communication to study the relationship between a personal fitness trainer and professional football player.

Presenters
XJ

Xavier Johnson

Multidisciplinary Stuides (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 1:10pm - 2:25pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
  Communication

1:10pm EDT

The Winding Research Road: Studying Nutrient Concentrations in the Ocean
The research process is a unique experience. It can be methodically planned or change multiple times until a final topic is established. In this case, the project’s research question has been changed and refined multiple times. It is common in the earth sciences to seek data that has already been collected to develop and answer a research question, which is different from other disciplines where the research question is established first, and then data is collected. This project started out as a study of the deep convection events occurring in the Irminger Sea during certain winters and how these events affect the concentration of dissolved oxygen throughout the water column. After finding out the data included other variables that contribute to biological processes in the ocean, the additional variables were to be incorporated into the data analysis. In the process of learning how to graph the data, a whole new data source was discovered that would allow the project to reach areas of the ocean outside of the Irminger Sea. The current state of the project is an exciting endeavor and the current development of the project’s topic would have not been possible without being open to new topics and allowing the research process to be fluid. Keeping an open mind about where the research process will go is especially important when the data available is major factor in determining the research topic.

Presenters
NS

Natalie Sprague

Ocean Science & Coastal Studies (BS)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 1:10pm - 2:25pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation

1:10pm EDT

Compass Mark: Meeting the Needs of Children with Incarcerated Parents
For many children and youth the experience of having an incarcerated parent is not only marked by missing that parent, but also by transitions in caretakers and living situations. Many of these caretakers may not be prepared for this situation financially or materially. Additionally, prisons may or may not be equipped to foster connectivity between incarcerated parents and their children, whether through visitation, counseling, or communication programs. Compass Mark runs a family services advocate program which strives to fill the gaps in the lives of these children. The question we are exploring is, what are the needs of children with incarcerated parents in Lebanon County, and has the program been effective in its mission? This research has found that Compass Mark Lebanon makes a significant difference in the lives of children in Lebanon County, particularly by providing caretakers with household and practical needs, but also going above and beyond necessities to become a trusted resource. The implications of this research make clear where community needs lie, and produce a discussion point for how the program can be used more effectively in the future. Data show that Compass Mark Lebanon is a valuable program for a group of children and youth who are otherwise overlooked, and it is effective in helping their caretakers provide a secure environment for them during a vulnerable time in their lives.

Presenters
RP

Rachel Preibisch

Social Work (MSW)
KP

Karizma Pomales

Sociology (BA)


Tuesday April 13, 2021 1:10pm - 2:25pm EDT
Live Zoom Presentation
 


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